This is History And Inventor Of Volleyball

This is History And Inventor Of  Volleyball

This History And Inventor Of VolleyballVolleyball is one of the most popular sports in the world. Volleyball is played by two opposing teams where each team consists of 6 people.
Volleyball inventor named William G. Morgan, a man from the United States. And the history of volleyball itself began in 1895. Volleyball was originally called Mintonette.

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Volleyball Inventor Profile
William G. Morgan was born in the area of ​​lockport, New York in 1870. He spent his time attending school and helping his father work on the Old Erie Canal.
In 1891, Morgan attended school at Mt. Hermon Preparatory School in Northfield, Massachusetts. Here he met and became friends with James A. Naismith who later became known as the inventor of basketball.

Naismith was amazed by Morgan's athletic abilities. He then advised Morgan to continue his education at Young Men's Christian Association Training School in the Springfield area.

At the YMCA, Morgan had joined the college football team. And in 1894, he graduated and accepted an offer as physical director at the Maine YMCA.

Beginning of the History of the Game of VolleyballThe following year, he received a similar offer from the Holyoke YMCA. At Holyoke, Morgan then developed a coaching program for grown men.
The training program or model carried out by Morgan is widely liked, making his coaching classes more and more.

Here, Morgan then realized that he needed a new game model that was entertaining and did not bore his students and was also competitive.
Even though at that time the game of basketball was popular, according to Morgan, basketball was too fast to be taught to his students.

William G. Morgan then began to develop a new game model based on his training methods and his experience while teaching at the YMCA.
Initially he thought of a game model like tennis, but according to Morgan, tennis requires a lot of equipment such as rackets, nets, balls and other additional equipment.
He then tried the idea of ​​using a net and ball in his new game. The net is then installed at a height of 2 meters.



640px;">First VolleyballFor the ball, Morgan originally used a basketball, but according to him, the basketball was too big and too heavy. He then asked the company AG Spalding & Bros to make a ball according to his request. The result is the size of the ball is quite satisfactory for Morgan.

The Birth of the Game of VolleyballThen in 1896, at a meeting attended by YMCA sporting directors, Morgan then demonstrated his new game.
At first, Morgan named his new game 'Mintonette' in which the players consisted of two teams of five people each.



Morgan explained to the participants who attended the meeting that the game he created could be played inside or outside the building. Where the purpose of the game he created is to keep the ball from passing over the net and falling into the opponent's territory.
After the demonstration of the game from Morgan finished, a professor named Alfred T. Halstead suggested Morgan that the name of the game be changed from Mintonette to Volley Ball or Volleyball.

Morgan then agreed to the suggestion from Professor Alfred. He also compiled the rules of the volleyball game and gave them to the participants in attendance. The Volleyball Rules compiled by Morgan were then published in July 1896.
After a long stint at the YMCA, Morgan then resigned from his job as physical director. He then joined General Electric and also Westinghouse.
Even so, he still pays attention to his game of volleyball. The game of Volleyball then developed rapidly since it was discovered by William G. Morgan.

William G. Morgan AwardWilliam G. Morgan was even invited as the guest of honor at the Springfield College Alumni Dinner considering his capacity as the inventor of Volleyball.

William G. Morgan died on December 28, 1942 in Lockport, New York, USA. The American Volleyball Association then awarded William G. Morgan the Volleyball Hall of Fame in Massachusetts, USA in 1985.

source: world sports history book page 106